Naomi Sato, M.D. and Robyn Kimura, M.D., Pediatrics

900 Florin Road, Suite B
Sacramento, California 95831
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(916) 421-8245

Well Check and Vaccine Schedule

Our office follows the routine well-check schedule recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the current national immunization schedule for children recommended by the Centers for Disease Control.

Your child should not only see the pediatrician for an illness. It is also important to schedule well-child-care exams regularly, beginning in infancy. Well check visits are recommended once a year from age 2 to 18 years old, and more frequently under age 2 years old (see table below for details). Also called well-care visits or check-ups, these routine examinations provide the best opportunity for the doctor to observe the progress of your child's physical and mental growth and development; to counsel and teach parents; to detect problems through screening tests; to provide immunizations; and to get to know one another. Well-care visits are strongly recommended as part of preventive pediatric care and help to detect health issues before they cause more serious problems. Well-child visits are also a good time for parents to raise questions and concerns about a child's development, behavior, nutrition, safety, and overall well-being.

This schedule is supported by extensive research and expert opinions and is updated yearly.  For more information on Dr. Sato and Dr. Kimura’s philosophy on vaccinations, click here.  If you're apprehensive about vaccinations, please do not hesitate to contact our office. Immunizations (also called vaccinations) are a series of shots given to children at different ages to help ward off serious, and potentially fatal, childhood diseases. Making sure your child receives immunizations when scheduled is the best way to help protect your child from potentially fatal diseases. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, vaccinations have reduced the number of infections from vaccine-preventable diseases by more than 90%.

Age / Well check visit
(The exact age of your child may differ depending on the interval since the last well check.)

Vaccines
This is a typical schedule only and will be adjusted if catch-up vaccines are needed. If no vaccines are listed for a particular check-up, the patient will still receive a comprehensive history and physical exam.
Click on the vaccine name to read its Vaccine Information Statement.

Birth

a well check is done in the hospital

  • Hepatitis B #1 (should be done in the hospital prior to discharge)

3 to 5 days old

a well check is done

2 to 4 weeks old

a well check is done

2 months old

a well check is done

  • DTaP* (diphtheria/tetanus/pertussis) #1
  • IPV* (polio) #1
  • HIB* (Haemophilus influenzae) #1
  • PCV (Pneumococcal conjugate) #1
  • Hepatitis B #2
  • Rotavirus #1

    *DTaP-IPV-HIB is given as a combination vaccine when available

4 months old

a well check is done

  • DTaP* (diphtheria/tetanus/pertussis) #2
  • IPV* (polio) #2
  • HIB* (Haemophilus influenzae) #2
  • PCV (Pneumococcal conjugate) #2
  • Rotavirus #2

    *DTaP-IPV-HIB is given as a combination vaccine when available

6 months old

a well check is done

  • DTaP* (diphtheria/tetanus/pertussis) #3
  • IPV* (polio) #3
  • HIB* (Haemophilus influenzae) #3
  • PCV (Pneumococcal conjugate) #3
  • Hepatitis B #3
  • Rotavirus #3

    *DTaP-IPV-HIB is given as a combination vaccine when available

9 months old

a well check is done

12 months old

a well check is done

  • HIB (Haemophilus influenzae) #4
  • PCV (Pneumococcal conjugate) #4
  • Hepatitis A #1
  • MMR* (measles/mumps/rubella) #1
  • Varicella* (chicken pox) #1
    *MMR-Varicella given as a combination vaccine when available
  • a PPD (skin test for tuberculosis) is done as an initial evaluation
  • Blood tests to screen for anemia and lead poisoning

15 months old

a well check is done

  • DTaP (diphtheria/tetanus/pertussis) #4

18 months old

a well check is done

24 months old

a well check is done

  • Blood tests to screen for anemia and lead poisoning

3 years old

a well check is done

4 years old

a well check is done

  • DTaP (diphtheria/tetanus/pertussis) #5
  • IPV (polio) #4
  • MMR* (measles/mumps/rubella) #2
  • Varicella* (chicken pox) #2

    *MMR-Varicella given as a combination vaccine when available

5 years old

a yearly well check is done

  • a PPD (skin test for tuberculosis for entrance to school
  • Blood tests to screen for anemia and lead poisoning, and a urine test (urinalysis) to screen for kidney problems
  • hearing and vision testing for entrance to school

6 to 10 years old

a yearly well check is done

  • Blood tests including cholesterol screen are done starting at 10 years old (or earlier if indicated)

11 years old

a well check is done

  • Tdap (tetanus/diphtheria/pertussis)
  • MCV (meningococcal) #1
  • HPV (human papillomavirus).  HPV is a 2 to 3 shot series given over 6 months.  If a child is under 15 years old when the first dose of HPV is given, only 2 doses 6 months apart are required.  If a child is 15 years or older when the first dose of HPV is given, 3 doses are required.  He/she should return for the 2nd HPV 2 months after the first, and for the 3rd HPV 6 months after the first
  • Blood tests including cholesterol screen are done starting at 10 years old (or earlier if indicated)

12 to 15 years old

a yearly well check is done

  • Blood tests including cholesterol screen if indicated

16 years old

a well check is done

  • MCV (meningococcal) #2
  • Blood tests including cholesterol screen if indicated
  • All girls 16 years and older will get a urine screen for chlamydia

17 to 18 years old

a yearly well check is done

  • Blood tests including cholesterol screen if needed
  • All girls 16 years and older will get a urine screen for chlamydia
  • We recommend an annual flu vaccine every year during flu season (August through June) for all children aged 6 months to 18 years old in addition to the vaccines above. The flu vaccine will be recommended at your child’s well check if not already given for that flu season.
  • We recommend and encourage the use of combination vaccines whenever available to reduce pain and risk of local reactions.
  • Children who have not received previously recommended vaccines will receive necessary “catch up” doses to bring them up to date with the vaccines recommended for their age.
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